How We Treat Poor Soil

Fertilization

We recommend a seasonal fertilization because trees in an urban landscape do not receive all the nutrients they would receive in a more natural habitat. Here’s how we do it:

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STEP 1


Fertilization

In the spring or fall the soil around the tree will be fertilized with Nitrogen (N), Phosphorus (P), Potassium (K), Iron (Fe), and Manganese (Mn) - all essential nutrients for healthy soil and root systems. The goal is to provide the tree with the best soil chemistry possible.

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STEP 2


Metabolic Processes

The tree acquires carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen from the atmosphere and from water. Using light energy from the sun (photosynthesis), these are combined to produce glucose. Other essential nutrients are gathered from the soil. The tree uses glucose and essential nutrients for growth, reproduction, pest and disease resistance.

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STEP 3
Evapotranspiration

Through this process the tree is able to move nutrients from the soil, up the trunk, and into the outer canopy, carrying them dissolved in water to be used as needed. This process continues throughout the growing season.

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STEP 4
Reduced Nutrient Levels

In urban soils macro and micronutrients can be depleted for several reasons, limiting metabolic processes. Fertilization helps maintain nutrient availability to trees by supplying needed elements that have been used by the tree or leached out of the soil.
BACK TO STEP 1